ADDIS ABABA

Ethiopia's capital and largest city is Addis Ababa. It is situated in the geographic center of the nation on a plateau that receives plenty of water, surrounded by hills and mountains. The capital of Ethiopian state, Addis Ababa, has only existed since the late 19th century. Its immediate predecessor, Entoto, which was located on a high tableland and was unsatisfactory due to intense cold and a severe lack of firewood, has since been replaced.

Ethiopia’s capital and largest city is Addis Ababa. It is situated in the geographic center of the nation on a plateau that receives plenty of water, surrounded by hills and mountains. The capital of Ethiopian state, Addis Ababa, has only existed since the late 19th century. Its immediate predecessor, Entoto, which was located on a high tableland and was unsatisfactory due to intense cold and a severe lack of firewood, has since been replaced. Emperor Menilek II (reigned 1889–1913)’s wife, Empress Taitu, encouraged him to construct a home close to the hot springs at the base of the tableland and to gift members of the aristocracy land in the area. This led to the establishment of the city in 1887, which the empress gave the name Addis Ababa (“New Flower”).

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The administrative and educational hub of Ethiopia is Addis Ababa. It is home to Addis Abeba University, founded in 1950, as well as a number of colleges for teacher preparation and technical schools. The National Library and Archives, palaces of former emperors, government departments, the Museum of the Institute of Ethiopian Studies, and the Yared School of Music, all run by the university, are all situated in the city. The African Union and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, the latter of which is housed in Africa Hall, are two international organizations with their main offices in the city.

Textiles, footwear, food, beverages, wood goods, plastics, and chemical items are among the products manufactured in Addis Abeba. The majority of Ethiopia’s service sectors are centered in the city. The nation’s top newspapers are published in Addis Abeba, which also has a concentration of banking and insurance sectors. On its journey to or from the ports of Djibouti, on the Gulf of Aden, or Asseb, Eritrea, on the Red Sea, the majority of Ethiopia’s export and import traffic passes through Addis Ababa. Additionally, the city serves as both the gathering and delivery hub for much of the domestic trade of the nation. One of the largest open-air markets in Africa is called The Mercato, and it is situated in the western portion of the city. More upscale European-style shopping centers may be found on Bole Road to the southeast and The Piazza in the city center.

The transportation network of the country is centered at Addis Abeba. It is connected to other significant cities by a number of roads; the only train goes to Djibouti. There is an international airport that serves the city.  There are few officially defined recreational sites, although there are many of open spaces that are good for recreation. The lake region, which is just a short drive to the south, includes amenities for boating, waterskiing, bathing, and bird-watching. A small zoo is situated in a park close to the university. Football is the most popular spectator sport (soccer). Other sports including volleyball, basketball, and others are also played, mostly by school teams.

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